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Tufted Puffin

10/25/17 - Welcome to Winged Wednesday! Still looking for the perfect costume? The Tufted Puffin is always Halloween ready with it's candy-corn colored beak and snow-white mask. To learn about California seabirds and what Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary is doing to help seabirds thrive, visit farallones.noaa.gov/eco/seabird (Photo: Peter Hodum, WDFW)

Ringed or Leopard Dorid

10/23/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! The Ringed or Leopard Dorid (Diaulula sandiegensis) is an intertidal species that grazes on sponges. You may spot these nudibranchs displaying a range of colors from white, to pale grey, brown, or even yellow. Most are 'spotted' with rings or spots (earning them their name!) but occasionally these patterns are absent. They lay long, delicate egg ribbons (as seen here) that are often hidden in crevices. Tell us what your favorite nudibranch is in the comments below! (Photo Credit: Steve Lonhart, NOAA/MBNMS)

Brandt's Cormorant

10/16/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! The Brandt's Cormorant (Phalacrocorax penicillatus) is the most common cormorant along the California coast, can you name the other 2 cormorants found in Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary? They are great divers and can dive 50 meters deep when pursuing prey! After a dive, you may spot them with their wings spread out to dry, as their feathers are not completely waterproof and become soaked. Having less oil on their wings helps reduce buoyancy and allows the cormorant to forage deeper under water. (Photo Credit: Chad King, NOAA/MBNMS)

humpback whale tail breching the water surrounded by shearwater
10/11/17 - Welcome to Winged Wednesday! Humpback whales feed by rounding up schools of fish in rich offshore waters and seabirds, like these Short-tailed Shearwaters, reap the benefits. Dinner is served! To learn about California seabirds and what Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary is doing to help seabirds thrive, visit seabirdprotectionnetwork.org (Photo: Brenda Rone / NOAA)
Turkish towel
10/9/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! Turkish towel (Chondracanthus exasperatus) is a red alga that acquired its name because it is covered in small bumps (called papillae) giving it a unique towel-like texture! Turkish towel contains carrageenan, which is used as a thickener in ice creams, chocolate milk, cottage cheese, pasta, pet food, pancake syrup, and toothpaste among other common household items! (Photo Credit: Chad King, NOAA/MBNMS)
blackeye goby
10/2/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! The blackeye goby (Rhinogobiops nicholsii) is a small fish, reaching lengths up to 6 inches, that is found mainly from the subtidal to depths of 500 feet. There are 2,000 goby species worldwide with at least 14 in California. Blackeye gobies are protogynous hermaphrodites; this means that they are born female, but become male when they reach a length of about 3 inches! (Photo Credit: Steve Lonhart, NOAA/MBNMS)
Blue Shark
9/28/17 - There are at least sixteen known species of sharks in the sanctuary! Do you know what type of shark this is? To find out more join us for Sharktoberfest on September 30! (Photo Credit: Walter Heim, NOAA/SWFSC)
Puffin
9/27/17 - Welcome to Winged Wednesday! Puffins in San Francisco? Just 30 miles offshore, the Farallon Islands are home to a whole colony of tufted puffins. And they’re not alone. The Farallon Islands host the largest breeding colony of seabirds in the continental US with over 250,000 birds! Learn more about seabirds and what Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary is doing to help seabirds thrive. (Photo: Sophie Webb / NOAA SWFSC)
White Shark
9/26/17 -Did you know that White Sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) can reach lengths of 21.5 feet! Find out more about sharks at Sharktoberfest, Saturday September 30th, 11am-4pm! (Photo Credit: Steven K. Webster/Monterey Bay Aquarium)
Long-beaked common dolphins
9/25/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! Long-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus capensis) are usually found in large social groups that consist of 100-500 animals! They feed on small schooling fish, krill and squid and are capable of diving to depths of at least 900 feet! They are a relatively small dolphin reaching lengths of 6-8.5 feet and weighing 160-500 pounds. The long-beaked common dolphin is easily confused with the similar looking short-beaked common dolphin; and the two were only separated into distinct species in the mid-1990s. (Photo Credit: Bernardo Alps, NOAA/SWFSC)
Leopard Sharks
9/23/17 - Leopard sharks have a gray body, white belly and black spots when they are young and living in shallow waters, but as they grow older these spots can fade. Who says a leopard can't change its spots? To find out more about the sharks living in our sanctuary, join us for Sharktoberfest. (Photo Credit: Adam Obaza/NOAA)
White Shark
9/19/17 - Sharktoberfest is coming! Save the Date! Saturday, September 30th, 2017 from 11 am to 4 pm, outside of the Farallones Marine Sanctuary offices at Crissy Field. (Photo Credit: Peter Winch)
Moon Jellies
9/18/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! Moon Jellies (Aurelia aurita) are named for their translucent moonlike bells that can grow up to approximately 15 inches across. Unlike many jellies that have long tentacles, the moon jelly has a short, fine fringe that sweeps in its planktonic food. The color of a moon jelly can change depending on diet; a crustacean heavy diet gives the jelly a pink or lavender tinge while brine shrimp turn it a light orange. (Photo Credit: Bill Goodwin/NOAA)
Pigeon Guillemot
9/13/17 - Welcome to Winged Wednesday! Feeling the end of summer heat? So are seabirds! Just like many humans, seabirds hop right into the water to cool off. With water temperatures in the low 60s, you can expect this Pigeon Guillemot cooled off right away. So make like a seabird and jump in! Learn more about seabirds and what Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary is doing to help seabirds thrive. (Photo: Sophie Webb / NOAA SWFSC)
Blue Heron
9/11/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) can be found in a wide range of habitats, as long as there is some water nearby. It is the largest member of the heron family and can stand up to 4.5 feet tall with an almost 7 foot wingspan! They feed primarily on fish but will also eat frogs, insects, crustaceans, snakes, turtles, rodents and small birds. (Photo Credit: Will Elder, NPS)
American White Pelican
9/4/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! The American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) prefers the brackish estuaries and lagoons of Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary and is not commonly seen near the open sea. Unlike the Brown Pelican, also seen in the sanctuary, the American White Pelican does not dive from the sky to fish. Instead they scoop up prey from a floating position on the water! (Photo Credit: Benjamin Sandford, NOAA/NWFSC)
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8/30/17 - Welcome to Winged Wednesday! Racking up frequent flyer miles this summer? So is the Laysan Albatross! These expert flyers soar hundreds of miles a day and can stay out at sea for years before touching down on land again. That is a lot of miles! Laysan Albatross visit the rich waters of California in summer in search of tasty squid, which is where this one was spotted. Learn about California seabirds and what Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary is doing to help seabirds thrive. (Photo:Laura Morse/NOAA)
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8/28/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! The smooth urn sponge (Leucilla nuttingi) is found from British Columbia down to Baja. These small animals form clusters of vase-shaped tubes that are only 1-2 cm tall. Sponges are unique in that their bodies are a collection of nearly independent cells, lacking organs and tissues like most other animals. Of a probable 10,000-15,000 sponges worldwide, only about 5,000 species have been described and named! (Photo Credit: Steve Lonhart, NOAA/MBNMS)
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8/21/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! The colonial tube worm (Dodecaceria fewkesi) creates a large mass of calcareous tubes to serve as its home. A colony is started by a single founder who then reproduces asexually. Each worm can reach a length of approximately 4 cm and feeds with small dark brown to black tentacles, which can be seen extending from the tubes in this picture! (Photo Credit: Steve Lonhart, NOAA/MBNMS)
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8/16/17 - Welcome to Winged Wednesday! The Common Murre uses its wings to "fly" underwater to depths of 600 feet. What does it do down there? Catch fish! Murres love to eat herring, cod, and capelin. They are often seen carrying food in their bill--like this squid! Learn more about seabirds and what Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary is doing to help seabirds thrive. (Photo: Sophie Webb / NOAA SWFSC)
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8/14/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! Gopher rockfish (Sebastes carnatus) are solitary and extremely territorial. They are nocturnal predators that feed mainly on crustaceans and will ambush their unassuming prey. Juvenile gopher rockfish, like this one, are often preyed upon by adult rockfish and lingcod. Good luck little fish! (Photo Credit: Steve Lonhart, NOAA/MBNMS)
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8/12/17 - We are headed out into Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary for a day of whale watching!  How are you spending your Get into Your Sanctuary Day? (Photo Credit: Sara Heintzelman, NOAA/GFNMS)
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8/11/17 - Don't forget to grab your camera when you celebrate Get Into Your Sanctuary Day this Saturday August 12th! Enter your best shots to the Get Into Your Sanctuary photo contest anytime until August 31! There are 3 categories: *Sanctuary Views *Sanctuary Life *Sanctuary Portraits. The best photos will be highlighted on the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries website! Please be careful not to disturb the wildlife that calls our sanctuaries home while taking your photos! Have fun getting creative and remember to take only photos, and leave only footprints (or bubbles!). For more information please go to our website. (Photo Credit: Joe Hoyt, NOAA)
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8/10/17 - Don't feel crabby, we still have a few spaces left in the 1:00-2:30pm Crab Family workshop on Saturday August 12th! Attention all creative crustaceans! It's Get Into Your Sanctuary Day so prepare your claws and carapaces for a family event devoted entirely to crabs! Learn about crab anatomy with our crab dress-up costume. Look and touch real live shore crabs and sand crabs. Use crab traps to fish for rock and Dungeness crabs off of our classroom pier. Contact Sara Heintzelman to reserve our Get into Your Sanctuary Events. (Photo Credit: Sara Heintzelman, NOAA/GFNMS)
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8/9/17 - Are you planning a final road trip for the summer? There are 15,333 square miles of national marine sanctuaries to explore along the West Coast! Visit NOAA Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary, Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary or NOAA Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and celebrate Get into Your Sanctuary Day on August 12th in one of these incredible locations! Where will you Get into Your Sanctuary? Find Get Into Your Sanctuary Events. Plan your own sanctuary adventure. (Photo Credit: Matt McIntosh, NOAA)
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8/7/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) have a widespread distribution and are one of the most well known species of marine mammals. They have a lifespan of 40-50 years, and females as old as 45 have given birth! Bottlenose dolphins have an unusual feeding strategy called "fish-whacking", where they'll use their fluke to whack a fish and knock it straight out of the water! (Photo Credit: NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center)
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8/5/17 - Are you still looking for ways to celebrate Get Into Your Sanctuary Day on August 12? There are fantastic spots to tidepool in Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary! Explore the amazing intertidal habitat at the edge of the sea where animals and algae survive under ever changing conditions. (Photo Credit: Matt McIntosh, NOAA)
Social media image 8/3/17 - Bingo!! Stop by the Greater Farallones Visitor Center on August 12th or 13th, 10am-4pm to borrow a bird bingo game sheet. Take a walk at the nearby beach and marsh and bring your completed bingo board back to the visitor center for a prize! (Photo Credit: Roy W. Lowe/USFWS)
Social media image 8/2/17 - Welcome to Winged Wednesday! The Trinidad coast is home to one of California's largest colonies of Common Murres; with over 60,000 birds nesting on Green and Flatiron Rocks alone! To help save future generations of these birds, a new North Coast Chapter of the Seabird Protection Network has been formed. Please join us in welcoming them to our team! Keep an eye out for these birds, and if you live in the Trinidad area consider volunteering to assist with Citizen Science! To learn more about seabirds and what the Seabird Protection Network is doing to help seabirds thrive along the northern California coast, visit the website. (Photo: NOAA/OCNMS)
Social media image 8/1/17 - We want to see your photos of the beautiful scenery in Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary! Submit your favorite sanctuary views to the Get Into Your Sanctuary photo contest! (Photo Credit: Sara Heintzelman, NOAA/GFNMS)
Social media image 7/31/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! The Monterey doris (Doris montereyensis) can reach lengths of 15cm and is usually a lemon-yellow color; however it can range in color from a brighter yellow-orange to nearly white. It lays ribbons of eggs that can contain up to 2 million individual eggs! (Photo Credit: Steve Lonhart, NOAA/MBNMS)
Social media image 7/29/17 - Raise a hand (or fin!) if you want to go whale watching! Plan a Get Into Your Sanctuary whale watching adventure in Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary on August 12th or 13th. (Photo Credit: Ed Lyman/NOAA Permit #15240)
Social media image 7/27/17 - Feeling crabby? Don't worry, there is a way for the whole family to enjoy Get into Your Sanctuary Day on Saturday August 12th! Join us for a morning or afternoon Crab Family Workshop. Attention all curious crustaceans! Prepare your claws and carapaces for a family event devoted entirely to crabs. Learn about crab anatomy with our crab dress-up costume and naturalist-led dissection of invasive green crabs. Look and touch real live shore crabs and sand crabs. As a grand finale, we will be using crab traps to fish for rock and Dungeness crabs off of our classroom pier. For more information or to register, contact Sara: sara.heintzelman@noaa.gov Check out all of our Get into Your Sanctuary Events. (Photo Credit: Kate Bimrose, NOAA/GFNMS)
Social media image 7/25/17 - If the ocean makes you jump for joy too, submit your favorite sanctuary portraits to the Get Into Your Sanctuary photo contest! (Photo Credit: Sara Heintzelman, NOAA/GFNMS)
Social media image 7/24/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! The Belted Kingfisher (Cerle alcyon) has a long, pointed beak, a dark blue head and a white throat. Females, such as the one in the picture, have a rusty colored band on their belly and sides. Kingfishers can be spotted diving into the water to catch their primary prey, small fish. Keep your eyes out for Belted Kinfishers if you visit the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary Visitor Center, this one was spotted close by! (Photo Credit: Will Elder, NPS)
Social media image 7/23/17 - Kayaks are a great way to explore your national marine sanctuaries! Plan a Get Into Your Sanctuary Day paddle adventure in Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. (Photo Credit: Sara Heintzelman, NOAA/GFNMS)
Social media image 7/21/17 - Looking for a whale of a good time? Join the Sanctuary Explorations program for a Farallon Islands & Whale Watching Trip on August 12 to celebrate Get into Your Sanctuary Day! Or find another Get into Your Sanctuary event near you. (Photo Credit: Peter Winch, NOAA/GFNMS)
Social media image 7/20/17 - It isn't too early to start celebrating Get Into Your Sanctuary Day! The photo contest is open now and you have until August 31st to enter. Submit your best images of the abundant sanctuary life; from invertebrates to birds, fish to marine mammals! There is no shortage of inspiration in Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Remember to be respectful of these marine critters and their homes! (Photo Credit: Sara Heintzelman, NOAA/GFNMS)
Social media image 7/19/17 - Welcome to Winged Wednesday! Keep an eye out for Double-crested Cormorants this July and August. Unlike most seabirds, Double-crested Cormorants don't have oily feathers for waterproofing. To dry their feathers after a wet swim, they stretch out their wings and face the wind. Good weather isn't required for drying, but it must help - which means Double-crested Cormorants might enjoy the summer sun as much as you do! Learn about California seabirds and what Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary is doing to help seabirds thrive. (Photo: Dick Daniels/NPS)
Social media image 7/17/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! The loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) was named for its relatively large head, which supports powerful jaws and enables them to feed on hard-shelled prey, such as whelks. Although hatchlings only weigh 20 grams, full grown adults can reach weights of 250 pounds! Pacific loggerheads migrate over 7,500 miles between nesting beaches in Japan and feeding grounds off the coast of Mexico! (Photo Credit: GP Schmahl/NOAA)
Social media image 7/15/17 - Get Into Your Sanctuary Day is August 12th! From a day-long adventure at sea, to family workshops, or drop-in activities- there is something and some way for everyone to participate in the Get Into Your Sanctuary celebration with Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. How will you celebrate Get Into Your Sanctuary day? (Photo Credit: Sara Heintzelman, NOAA/GFNMS)
Social media image 7/14/17 - You're invited! On August 12th, we'll be holding a nation-wide "Get Into Your Sanctuary" celebration. From a walk on the beach to a surfing adventure, a visit to an aquarium or a sanctuary staff-led event, there is something for everyone and many ways to enjoy your national marine sanctuaries! To figure out where to go, what to do and get a sneak peak of what you might see, check out our Visit page.
Social media image 7/12/17 - Celebrate the upcoming Get Into Your Sanctuary day by getting out and taking photos that show off the natural beauty and importance of our marine sanctuaries! The photo contest has officially opened! You can enter anytime until August 31! There are 3 categories: Sanctuary Views, Sanctuary Life, and Sanctuary Portraits. The best photos will be highlighted on the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries website! Please be careful not to disturb the wildlife that calls our sanctuaries home while taking your photos! Have fun getting creative and remember to take only photos, and leave only footprints (or bubbles!). (Photo Credit: Matt McIntosh, NOAA, ONMS)
Social media image 7/10/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! Grass rockfish (Sebastes rastrelliger) can be recognized by their red-rimmed eyes, which are closely set and located toward the top of their large heads; these features can give the impression that they are cross-eyed! They are masters of camouflage and tend to stay in the same crack or crevice. While they are hard to spot, once you locate one, chances are that the same individual will continue to be found in that location time after time! (Photo Credit: Steve Lonhart, NOAA/MBNMS)
Social media image 7/5/17 - Welcome to Winged Wednesday! Strike a pose! This Common Murre is poised and undeniably beautiful! Learn about California seabirds and what Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary is doing to help seabirds thrive. (Photo: Dick Daniels/NPS)
Social media image 7/3/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! The sea-clown triopha (Triopha catalinae) is a distinctive nudibranch with its pale body and bright orange spots. It feeds on bryozoans in mid to low rocky intertidal areas. The sea-clown is one of the largest nudibranchs that is able to crawl on the underside of tide pool surface films, usually a feat only accomplished by smaller nudibranchs! (Photo Credit: Greg McFall, NOAA/CBNMS)
Social media image 6/26/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! Despite its appearance, the American Coot (Fulica americana) is not a duck but in the Family Rallidae, which included rails, gallinules, and coots. A unique feature of the coot is that it has lobed toes rather than webbed feet. Coots can be seen running across the water, beating their wings for quite a distance to get themselves airborne! (Photo Credit: Steve Lonhart, NOAA/MBNMS)
Social media image 6/21/17 -Welcome to Winged Wednesday! Point Reyes National Seashore is a treasure for many reasons, not least of all because it’s prime habitat for seabirds, including tens of thousands of common murres. If you haven’t seen them yet, grab some binocs, a windbreaker and check out the colony near the lighthouse - not to mention the big blue expanse of the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary beyond! Learn more about common murres and what Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary is doing to help seabirds thrive. (Photo: Sandy Rhoades/USFWS)
Social media image 6/19/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! Green Pin Cushion Alga (Cladophora columbiana) may look just like moss, but it is a green alga found in the mid to high intertidal. Its spongy filaments help it effectively hold water, allowing it to survive long periods of exposure to the air and sun. This is one of the species monitored by the LiMPETS program! Find out more about LiMPETS (Photo Credit: Monika Krach, Greater Farallones Association)
Social media image 6/18/17 - Happy Father's Day! We know that there are a lot of incredible fathers out there and Common Murre dads are among them! Did you know that Common Murre chicks leave their rocky, cliffside nests just 3 weeks after hatching? First the fathers coax the flightless chicks to jump from the cliffs down to the sea, then the fathers spend the next 2 months teaching their chicks how to survive life as a seabird. Good job dads! (Photo Credit: OCNMS, NOAA)
Social media image 6/12/17 - Happy Marine Life Monday! The fragile pink urchin (Strongylocentrotus fragilis) is a deep sea species and is usually found at depths of 300-1600 feet. The fragile pink urchin feeds on bits of plants and animals that drift down to its deep environment. Like other urchins, it has tiny tube feet and spines that it uses to pass the treasured food scraps to its mouth which is on the bottom of its body! (Photo Credit: IfAME MBNMS MARE TNC)
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6/8/17 - Happy World Oceans Day! Looking for a way to celebrate World Oceans Day? Come visit Greater Farallones education staff at the San Francisco Zoo from 10am-3pm this Sunday, June 11th! (Photo Credit: Kate Thompson/NOAA)

Social media image The spotted ratfish (Hydrolagus colliei) is a chimaera and has some characteristics of sharks (cartilaginous fish) and some characteristics of bony fish. This deep sea species can be found as deep as 1000 meters and can be spotted cruising along the seafloor looking for shrimp, clams, worms, sea stars, or other fishes to feed on! (Photo Credit: Jean DeMarignac / NOAA MBNMS)
social media imageThe Arctic Tern (Sterna paradisaea) is well known for its amazing annual migration. With a wingspan of 25-29 inches and a weight of only 3-4 ounces, this small bird migrates around 22,000 miles from Arctic breeding grounds to its wintering grounds off of Antarctica! (Photo Credit: Ken Conger, NPS)
social media imageIn 1994, seabird biologist Harry Carter had a vision: to restore the common murre colony at Devil's Slide Rock, which had been completely abandoned as a result of an oil spill and gillnet fisheries. Carter assembled a daring team, piloted zodiacs in rough seas, and climbed the rock to place decoys he hoped would attract the murres back to their old home. Year after year, that work continued, and more birds started breeding on the rock. Thanks to this long term commitment over the past twenty years, the colony today is now home to 2,000 nesting common murres.

social media imageFrom striving to thriving, the Brown Pelican is an endangered species success story! Nearly extinct in the 1970's they have rebounded to healthy numbers since DDT was banned. The Endangered Species Act made this possible and the California Brown Pelican was delisted in 2009. (Photo Credit: Matt McIntosh/NOAA)

 

social media imageThe North American River Otter (Lontra canadensis) population has been rebounding in Northern California in recent years after historic declines due to pressures from hunting, pollution and habitat loss. Although somewhat similar in appearance to their relatives the sea otter, the river otter does not float on its back and is much more agile on land. They reach lengths of about 4 feet (including their tails!) and weigh 10-30 pounds. They can be found in a wide variety of marine and freshwater habitats where they search for fish, sea stars, crabs, mussels, amphibians, and bird eggs to feast on. (Photo Credit: NPS)
social media imageShortly after hatching, common murre chicks stretch their wings for their first... swim! Common murres learn to swim and dive before they fly. In fact, they are such incredible divers and swimmers that they are often described as “flying” through the water. Make sure you give common murre chicks space as they enter Greater Farallones and Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuaries for their very first time. (Photo: RJ Roush)
social media imageThe shag-rug nudibranch (Aeolidia papillosa) can be found in the low intertidal and subtidal zones from Alaska through central California. Their shaggy appearance mimics the sea anemones that these nudibranchs feed on! (Photo Credit: Steve Lonhart, NOAA/MBNMS)
social media imageThe copper rockfish (Sebastes caurinus) has pronounced spines and the rear two thirds of its lateral line is distinctly light which helps distinguish it from similar looking rockfish species. The copper rockfish can reach lengths of approximately 26 inches and has been know to live for 50 years!
(Photo Credit: Chad King, NOAA/MBNMS)
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I spy, with my little eye, a giant, soaring black-footed albatross. Welcome to Winged Wednesday! Black-footed albatrosses are “medium-sized” albatrosses, but they're nonetheless huge birds with 7-foot wingspans. These birds can be found off California year-round, but they're more abundant during our upwelling season, April-September, when our coastal waters are most productive and full of yummy seabird food. Please join us in welcoming many black-footed albatrosses back to our California sanctuaries! Learn more about seabirds and what Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary is doing to help seabirds thrive. (Photo: NOAA)